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Innovation and Adaptation Within Corporate Hierarchies: Mechanisms and New Questions.

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    • Abstract:
      Building on recent work on corporate hierarchies and renewed interest in them, this symposium offers a new look at corporate hierarchies with respect to innovation and adaptation. Hierarchies are a pervasive organizational structure in the modern society. Technological advances and environmental change may have led a flatter organization to become widespread nowadays. But, the organizations of the knowledge economy ' whether loosely coupled, networked, or federalized ' seem to be no more than modifications of the same basic structure. Organizational and strategy research has advanced our understanding for how they affect firm behavior and outcomes. But, it seems that we have yet to systematically examine when and how corporate hierarchies either constrain or enable firm innovation and adaptation. As a new research program, this symposium augments current research by revealing specific mechanisms that describe hierarchies either as a constraint or as an enabler. We feature five panelists, Zur Shapira, Felipe Csaszar, John Joseph, Samina Karim and Metin Sengul, who have taken different approaches in their examinations of this topic. They will provide their own insight into existing work and discuss new questions for future research in this area. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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